Popobawa Demon Names List

Demon: Popobawa

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Popobawa

Popobawa means "found" in Zanzibar, Africa and has even been reported in Tanzania. This demon name literally translates from Swahili to "bat-wing." Popbawa is a demon who rapes its" victims. This demon will rape men, women, and children.

The victim thinks they are in waking dream as sleep paralysis sets in having the victim fall to hypnopompic or hypnogogic hallucination. Characteristics include extreme vividness during these "dreams" and Popobawa attacks. The unlucky victim is about to experience sexual assault from this evil spirit giving just cause for Popobawa panics. Making matters worse, this invasion can happen well throughout the night, for hours, mass hysteria set in and many locals were terrified.

As the panics occur and the horror is committed, victims claim to smell a sulfurous odor.

The Popobawa demon is a shapeshifter demon, appearing as a normal man by day but changes to an animal form gigantic one-eyed bat-like creature by night with a huge p***is claimed to be up to 6 feet in length. Some victims describe the demon as a ghost or a demon.

The Popobawa possesses supernatural strength and can fly at high speeds for long distances. The sex demon can also glide through solid objects.

Not to be confused with the Incubus demon, Popobawa will attack even men in their beds violating them both mentally and physically. To avoid these demon attacks, men do not sleep in their beds. Initial demon attacks last as long as one hour with the threat of repeat visits that last longer. The victim is old to tell friends and neighbors of the demon attacks else repeat visits will occur.

Before the attacks, victims hear strong scraping noises on their roofs and smell a foul order. Some victims report seeing a puff of smoke.

Stories of the Popobawa state that the demon possesses human bodies. The demon becomes enraged if disbelieved and becomes vengeful. Cases of the Popobawa include many once non-believing men.

Modern Popobawa Attacks

Reports of Popobawa attacks rise and fall with the election cycle in Zanzibar. Some people claim that the Popobawa is the vengeful ghost of the assassinated President Abeid Karume, or was summoned by the Chama Cha Mapinduzi political party.

Popobawa reports rose dramatically in 1995 leading to another increase of attacks that were reported in Dar es Salaam in 2007.

The villagers of Island of Pemba claim that the Popobawa spoke to the villagers after possessing a girl called Fatuma. The monster possessed the girl and spoke through her in the deep voice of a man while they heard strange sounds like a revving car on the roof of a house.

Popobawa Attack Locations

Attacks occur most often in Zanzibar, throughout the island of Pemba and in the north and west of Unguja island, including Zanzibar City, Dar es Salaam, and other towns on the mainland coast of Tanzania.

Protection

To repel the creature, smearing pig"s oil on your body will help. Popobawa hates salt and iron (pure or cold-forged) which may harm/kill the demon. The Popobawa can not attack a person who sleeps outdoors. The demon may be removed or repelled with religious charms and appeased with sacrifices.

History

One popular story is that a Sheikh released a Djinni to wreak vengeance on his enemies. The Djinni broke free of the control of the Sheikh and became an evil entity.

Another popular story is that Zanzibar was once the site of the Arab Slave market. The Popobawa is the collection of the slaves" pain brought to life as a thought-form.

Further Reading

  • Thompson, Katrina Daly. (2014). "Swahili Talk About Supernatural Sodomy", Critical Discourse Studies, 11: 71-94.
  • Nickell, Joe. (1995). "The Skeptic-raping Demon of Zanzibar", Skeptical Briefs, December 1995.
  • Nickell, Joe via an article in Skeptical Inquirer in 1995.

The Popobawa demon is a male demon.

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Notes

Hell Horror takes no responsibility for any views expressed about these spirits/gods and casts no judgement about any one's specific religion/beliefs. This page is meant strictly as reference material.